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Governance

April 1, 2002

Many multi-generational family firms make up the French economy. They demonstrate resilience and renewal in hardship, good family organisation and, for some, acceptance of in-laws in top roles

Many multi-generational family firms make up the French economy. They demonstrate resilience and renewal in hardship, good family organisation and, for some, acceptance of in-laws in top roles

April 1, 2002

In this issue’s guest editorial, Carol S Pearson discusses the role archetypal branding can play in the success of a company and how family businesses are particulary suited to it

In this issue's guest editorial, Carol S Pearson discusses the role archetypal branding can play in the success of a company and how family businesses are particulary suited to it

April 1, 2002

In the last issue, Kelin Gersick described the differences between the ‘pyramid’ view, emphasising the generational expansion of one family, and the ‘network’ view, focusing on the complex relationships among the multiple units of an extended family. Part II of this article explores the implications of that developmental model for the critical tasks of governance and continuity

In the last issue, Kelin Gersick described the differences between the 'pyramid' view, emphasising the generational expansion of one family, and the 'network' view, focusing on the complex relationships among the multiple units of an extended family. Part II of this article explores the implications of that developmental model for the critical tasks of governance and continuity

April 1, 2002

I was talking recentlyto the Chairman of a financial services organisation, telling him about my interest in family business and my desire to establish a new international centre for the study of leadership in family firms at London Business School.

I was talking recentlyto the Chairman of a financial services organisation, telling him about my interest in family business and my desire to establish a new international centre for the study of leadership in family firms at London Business School. The Chairman was interested, but after a while asked "Aren't they a thing of the past in the UK?"This is not the first time I have heard this belief expressed, and by people who you might think would know better. Around three years ago it was estimated that 75% of all British businesses were family-owned and -managed.

April 1, 2002

Family businesses have special traits that allow them to follow different, unconventional business strategies to those pursued by non-family firms – the advantages of trust within the business, ownership commitment and a longer term view all contribute to their strategic success

Family businesses have special traits that allow them to follow different, unconventional business strategies to those pursued by non-family firms – the advantages of trust within the business, ownership commitment and a longer term view all contribute to their strategic success

February 1, 2002

Swiss family businesses are focused on the relevant business and corporate issues that need to be addressed for future success but fare less well on the emotional issues such as succession

Lombard Odier & Cie, in conjunction with IMD, carried out an in-depth study on family businesses in Switzerland during Spring 2001 because we became aware that little is known about such businesses, even though they are the key threads of the Swiss social and economic fabric. Therefore, we tried to better understand the ties between these families and their companies, to become aware of their concerns relating to the continuity and passing on of those businesses and to define the relevant issues more efficiently.

February 1, 2002

A new generation of skilled entrepreneurs and the instability of industry within the public sector brought about a serious rethinking regarding the potential of privately-owned businesses in India

The centre of the Indian social identity is the family. In many cases, the family not only tells you who you are but also what you do. Thus, family businesses are not merely economic structures; for most business community individuals, the business is the source of their social identity. Furthermore, the family and the business are not treated separately. The boundaries of essentially two different systems, family and business – with distinctive rules governing their respective behaviours – overlap within the business house.

February 1, 2002

GEEF, the organisation representing owner-managed and family businesses throughout Europe, is concerned about the difficulties which entrepreneurs encounter when transferring their business from one generation to the next or when the business is sold to a third person.

GEEF, the organisation representing owner-managed and family businesses throughout Europe, is concerned about the difficulties which entrepreneurs encounter when transferring their business from one generation to the next or when the business is sold to a third person. For this reason, an extensive benchmark study has been conducted to give an overview of relevant taxation situation in the GEEFcountries: Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Portugal, Spain Sweden and the UK.

February 1, 2002

Senior level recruitment from ‘outside’ the family enterprise can be one the most risky yet important decisions a business has to make. Here, we discuss the issues, illustrated by some experiences from candidates, employers and a specialist recruitment agency

Family enterprises facetheir greatest challenge when it comes to recruiting external employees at senior management level, yet there seems little that any business can do to guarantee success.

There are many tales of family business founders who want to step down or retire but who face the problem of no obvious successor within the business, or within the family.

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